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Translations to other languages

PostPosted: May 28th, 2012, 11:20 pm
by Denise
NicoleH's comment in the "Getting to Know You" thread got me to thinking. Why in the world would they translate a title to "Vampire to Give Away"? Why can't they just translate it as "Born to Bite"? I don't understand. Anyone have any insight to the thoughts behind translating these to other languages?

Re: Translations to other languages

PostPosted: May 29th, 2012, 5:00 pm
by TomEC
Denise wrote:NicoleH's comment in the "Getting to Know You" thread got me to thinking. Why in the world would they translate a title to "Vampire to Give Away"? Why can't they just translate it as "Born to Bite"? I don't understand. Anyone have any insight to the thoughts behind translating these to other languages?


Just taking a stab at this, but "Born to Bite" is a takeoff on songs like "Born to be Wild" and "Born to Run." Maybe there's no equivalent in German. As for the title "Vampire to Give Away," I couldn't ever begin to guess myself. That is a puzzler.

Re: Translations to other languages

PostPosted: June 11th, 2012, 10:54 am
by susan60625
I'm thinking that maybe when they change the title during translation, it could be that 1) the direct translation would be too long, or 2) they are trying to make the translated title rhyme.

Re: Translations to other languages

PostPosted: June 10th, 2013, 3:50 pm
by NessaRose
Well, for the German titles I think they also use movie titles and alter them, they way they did it with some of the English ones, e.g. "A Vampire and a Gentleman" is taken from "An Officer and a Gentleman" (Victor's story). Most don't really fit to the story, others work nicely. Cale's story was titled "Vampire รก la carte" and two short stories came out together in a book called "A Vampire For Every Season" (Tiny and Teddy's stories).

But I'm not as annoyed by the titles as I am by the translations themselves.... often, they appear unclear and not very well written. That's why I've started to only read the novels in English - much more wit and fun to read :)

I've really given up trying to understand what German editors think.... but since I want to pursue a career in publishing, I'll try my best to change something in the future, ha ha *dream*

Re: Translations to other languages

PostPosted: June 10th, 2013, 5:33 pm
by susan60625
Sounds like a plan, NessaRose!

Re: Translations to other languages

PostPosted: June 12th, 2013, 12:44 pm
by terri
NessaRose,

Thank-you for giving your opinion about the translations. We wouldn't know unless a reader fill us in. I hope you do get into the industry and show them how it's done. <G>

TErri

Re: Translations to other languages

PostPosted: June 19th, 2013, 4:24 am
by nightmare
I don't think they try to translate the titles. My impression is they come up with a title that has
the word "Vampire" in it and might match with the book content.
And yes I think too they try to use movies titles. :D ;)

As for the translation of the books I think it is good enough for most people. Of course it is always better to read the original but not everyone can read english books as easy as german.
It is like movies, some of the fun is lost in translation but how would you know unless you watch the original?

I kind of like the book covers and I like them on my bookshelf. So I buy the german ones and read them and only after I read them I buy the english version for my Kindle and read it too. ;) :D

Re: Translations to other languages

PostPosted: June 19th, 2013, 8:08 am
by grlnxtdr29
You are correct about seeing a movie in it's Original language and comparing it to the Translation. In my High School French class we watched the Original French Version of Three Men and a Baby, and It was Hilarious, then they made an English Version of it, and It was Funny too, but not the same as the Original. I've never tried to read a fiction book in a foriegn Language, as I speak more French and German than I can read, but I expect it is the same as watching a moving that has been translated...

Re: Translations to other languages

PostPosted: June 24th, 2013, 3:46 pm
by NessaRose
nightmare wrote:I kind of like the book covers and I like them on my bookshelf. So I buy the german ones and read them and only after I read them I buy the english version for my Kindle and read it too. ;) :D


I do almost the same - I have the German titles up till Nicholas' story and after that I switched to English because I didn't want to wait for the next German edition to come out :D but now I'm also getting my favourites from before Nicholas as ebooks in English, so I can take them everywhere :)

Re: Translations to other languages

PostPosted: June 26th, 2013, 8:58 am
by NessaRose
grlnxtdr29 wrote: I've never tried to read a fiction book in a foriegn Language, as I speak more French and German than I can read, but I expect it is the same as watching a moving that has been translated...


In my opinion, it is similar, but not the same. What I noticed since I'm back in Germany after living in Canada is that I am annoyed by dubbed movies. I had never noticed before, but of course the language I hear is not "in sync" with the language I see on the lips of the actors. As I said, it wasn't a big deal before, but now it just seems unnatural and distracting.... and sometimes I can't enjoy a movie because of it...

While it is true that I also prefer the original version of books to the translated one, I do not have the same problems as with movies if the translation in itself "is a whole". That is, if the translator has a nice style of writing that matches the story. So I can still be pulled into the story and will only notice differences when reading the original as well.

Thinking of that, when I was looking into reviews for Lynsay's historicals (some are being finally translated into German), I noticed that many readers criticized the translator for using too modern language and even vulgar terms.... I think, in the end, you can enjoy a translated version if it is done well, but apparently, some are not :(