What is the..........


Re: What is the..........

Postby lisa on October 6th, 2008, 4:40 am

Is Halloween big in England? Scotland? I mean as far as dressing up in costumes? little kids trick-or-treating? (although that last is not as popular here now -H parties are becoming more popular) Lately at area churches they have Fall Festivals and kids dress as bible characters with hay rides and cookout hot dogs/burgers/ and marshmallows. BTW, anyone else just chime in to answer if you want, I know diff things are regional as well as diff in each country.
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Re: What is the..........

Postby sin on October 6th, 2008, 7:10 am

My dad's church has what they call "Trunk or Treat". The parking lot of the church has car, trucks or what ever mode of transportation, with decorations. The kids go from vehicle to vehicle trick or treating. They have games, face painting, hot dogs& hamburgers. Also a contest for the costumes. It is a safe way for the kids. Also some stores have it too. Wal-Mart is real big on it. They have it posted as to th times. The kids go to the cashiers and in different departments. Also have other activities. The hospitals have it so you can bring you candy there so it can be x-rayed. I know it sounds terrible, but you want to be safe. If people were not so mean this would not happen. Times sure have changed.
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Re: What is the..........

Postby Denise on October 6th, 2008, 9:18 am

Our church also does a Fall Festival with Trunk or Treat. Cotton Candy, popcorn, snow cones, hotdogs, chili, nachos and then the carnival style games and an inflatable jumper, and bubble machine. No scary costumes. It's a madhouse!
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Re: What is the..........

Postby Mr Spice on October 6th, 2008, 1:24 pm

lisa wrote:Is Halloween big in England? Scotland?


No, traditionally it's never been celebrated in the UK although over the past few years it's grown on popularity - or perhaps I should say it's become a more significant retailing opportunity and therefore has been more strongly encouraged.

Around this period - November 5th - we actually have our own big celebration, which is variously named Guy Fawkes Night or Bonfire Night. We build bonfires and have firework displays to celebrate the failure - in 1605 - of an attempt to overthrow the government by means of blowing up The Houses of Parliament.

Guy Fawkes Night was always a much bigger event in the calendar than was Halloween and kids would spend the weeks beforehand collecting wood, newspapers and cardboard for building the bonfires - and in the area where I lived this was called chumping. It was always a matter of some pride to try and have the largest bonfire in the district and you had to guard your fire in the run up to November 5th since there would be groups of kids forming raiding parties going round to try and steal wood from other fires in the area. Again, locally there was a word for this activity but it slips my mind for the present.

Another thing that we would do in the run up to Guy Fawkes Night was to make a Guy. This was what could almost be described as a mannequin, made of rags, old clothes and whatever else could be scrounged and was a representation of old Guy Fawkes himself. The Guy would be pushed around the district in an old stroller (the Guy would be anything up to life size) with a gang of kids crying out "Penny for the Guy". The idea being to collect financial donations towards the cost of fireworks - the more money you collected the better would be the firework display in your local area. On the night itself the Guy would take pride of place on top of the bonfire and would be burned in a symbolic display.

There were also particular foods and cakes that were specific to the night. Bonfire toffee was made by the mothers of the local kids, along with a type of cake known as parkin, quite often in the shape of a pig (parkin pigs). Baked potatoes were usually served, along with roasted chestnuts, toffee apples and there would be gallons of pop (soda) for us thirsty kids to drink. It used to be a real family night with all the local people gathering together to create the display. There were very few municipal firework events when I was growing up, it was very much a people's festival. It wasn't even illegal in those days for young kids to buy fireworks and, needless to say, there were occasionally some serious accidents, but mostly we all had a good time and got through unscathed.

I have to say, looking back, it all seems like much more fun than it is possible to have in today's over commercialised and over regulated world.
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Re: What is the..........

Postby Copper on October 6th, 2008, 2:18 pm

oh wow it funny to hear you talk like like that i keep forgeting ur a felow brit Mr Spice i love this time of year i always have big halloween partys and try really hard to come up with costumes lol

oh and i love guy fawkes we always have a neighbourhood bonfire with toffee apples and cider lots of fun cuddeld up watching the fireworks
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Re: What is the..........

Postby Mr Spice on October 6th, 2008, 5:01 pm

Fellow Brit? I'm from closer than you think, Copper. My father was from Motherwell and there's a long line of us spread all over Lanarkshire.
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Re: What is the..........

Postby lisa on October 6th, 2008, 5:03 pm

Sounds like a real Blast!!! :lol: It definetly sounds better than prewrapped candy that you can buy at any store. I am very much an adult now (sometimes) but trick or treating was mostly to my immediate neighbors ( who were also relatives) houses. I still have been known to dress in costume for Halloween when the office allows it, but I have a new boss this year (recently) so I dont think anyone has got the nerve up to ask yet.
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Re: What is the..........

Postby love2read on October 6th, 2008, 11:56 pm

Wow intresting history Mr. Spice, I saw this movie called V for Vendetta and it was centered around Guy Fawkes and the whole trying to blow up parliment event. It was a cool movie. :)
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Re: What is the..........

Postby Copper on October 7th, 2008, 5:08 am

Mr Spice wrote:Fellow Brit? I'm from closer than you think, Copper. My father was from Motherwell and there's a long line of us spread all over Lanarkshire.


wow that quite close lol my im from edinburgh but on both sides of my family were cole miners in livinston so very close lol and i am a ritchie lol its funny to hear you family was so close by scarry :)
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Re: What is the..........

Postby booboolizzy on October 7th, 2008, 7:26 pm

Wow, after reading Mr. Spice's post, the movie V for Vendetta makes a lot more sense. There is an annual event held in the Black Rock Desert, in Northern Nevada called "Burning Man". It starts on the Monday before, and ends on the day of, the American Labor Day holiday. It takes its name from the ritual burning of a large wooden effigy on Saturday evening. I watched a documentary about it in a college class. I've never been there, but it is supposedly an experiment in community, radical self-expression, and radical self-reliance. Some of the images from the documentary are very odd. Anyway, Mr. Spice's post reminded me of because of the slightly similarity to the burning man.

However, I have a hard time picturing Mr. Spice as a hippy dancing around merrily smelling like patchouli in the desert. :D
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